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tainted love wigan casino Interview: Kev Roberts, Wigan Casino DJ Red Bull Music Academy Daily This app works best with JavaScript enabled.
In an age when people rarely went further than the pub for palace casino flash version entertainment, the Casino attracted dancers by the busload from up and down the country.
So, just like later superclubs, its most famous DJs were not necessarily its best.
He was thrust into the Premier League, securing a Casino residency.
Roberts has stayed true to northern soul, organising regular events and weekends and issuing many excellent compilations through pink advert actress Goldmine label.
Frozen drizzle clung to the car as we zoomed toward Worksop where Kev lived.
When did you start collecting?
How did you get into soul in the first place?
The first people I ever bought records from were Brian Selby and John Bratton.
A legendary record store, in fact.
One of the biggest indies in the north.
Brian and John were obviously soul boys.
I was far too young for that.
Standard records in that particular shop.
Local as in Nottingham?
Mansfield first, then into Nottingham.
Was Mansfield more happening?
Well Mansfield is a very large town that happened to have a lot of club action going on.
It was interesting in the North Midlands, because you found that those kind of scenes there.
Yes, they were playing pop music like Love Affair too, but like a lot of other good working class towns, they were also playing Homer Banks and James Go here and they were playing ska and soul mixed in.
A very good friend of mine had a brother who used to go to the Wheel, so by 1969 my taste had mansion casino complaints from just click for source Tamla to Stax and Atlantic, then suddenly discovering the Artistics, Billy Stewart, Tony Clark, these kind of people.
They had a soul cellar downstairs, so you ended up just discovering things in the cheap boxes.
Especially, if you already recognise a name you like on the label like the producer.
My entire earnings were spent on records.
Not super rarities, but lots of £3 and £4 sounds.
Up The Junction in Crewe was my first nighter, again with the Selectadisc crew.
One of the guys who worked in Selectadisc was Alan Day, who was a big DJ at the time, from Horsley Woodhouse near Derby.
And Alan took me under his wing.
Some guys are just characters in clublife.
Alan was more of a character than a DJ.
I went once there.
Absolute severe bollocking from my mum and dad for staying out all night and not telling them.
Quite right, too, because I was 15.
And then my eyes lit up for the next one because that was to the Torch in Stoke.
And I absolutely loved it.
I lived for that particular club.
Tell me about the Torch.
The residents were Alan Day,Keith Minshull, Tony Jebb and Martin Ellis.
I thought it was terrific, because that was the first place that had an abundance of American 45s.
By the time the Torch came it was U.
In 1972 it turned into an all-nighter, much to the dismay of a lot of the locals, I might add.
For me though, it was terrific.
And every one of them was a stonker.
They were all fast, furious great vocals.
Obscurities on the Okeh label.
And I loved the way it was laid out like a ranch.
What did it look like from the outside?
Outside it looked like a social club in the middle of a terraced street.
It was on Hove Street in Tunstall.
Tunstall is the end of the world for any venue.
How can I describe it?
It was five miles out tainted love wigan casino the way.
There was no railway station.
You had to walk a mile up a great big bank to get to it.
But once you were inside it was absolutely terrific.
The Wheel had a lot of credibility because it was playing really black records at the time, stuff like Bobby Bland.
They all had incredible Motown-type choruses.
Yet here were 50 or 60 brand new discoveries all being played at a new all-nighter, all of them fantastic.
Did the DJs playing have previous track records?
Well, yes and no.
I think please click for source were all collectors who were on the fringe of the nighter scene.
Keith Minshull was local.
Colin Curtis was local.
I think these were guys who were plotting their course.
That was out three years before the Trammps recorded the vocals.
New singles being played at an all-nighter.
Again, they worked a treat.
The song element was very important at the Torch.
The record had to have some substance to it.
When did you start DJing?
The Brit, as they called it, in Nottingham, which was a part of a row of boat clubs in West Bridgeford.
I used to take my records down there, just hoping that one day I might get that opportunity to put records on.
The manager was going to start a Saturday night and the other guys already had other gigs.
And then I think because the Friday night was costing him a fair bit in DJs, he lost a couple of DJs and so I ended up there on a Friday and Saturday.
So I invested my entire salary on better records.
I was suddenly being able to afford at least one £10 single a week.
I decided to go to Blackpool Mecca for a nine-till-two session.
Was that when Tony Jebb was still there?
It was Colin Curtis and Keith Minshull originally.
Keith left and came back into play.
He was originally at the Mecca and came back.
The Brit was only on till 11 and I got someone to cover for me the last hour.
Just for two hours in Blackpool.
But it was just the place.
At this stage who was the key DJ?
michigan riverboat casino was the most innovative.
That, for me, was a creative DJ.
But he had an ability to break records.
Anyhow, through Selectadisc circles I met Simon Soussan.
The first guy really to go to the States, find records and put lists out.
Some people got the records.
However, he found absolutely fantastic records.
A lot of the Torch stuff came from him.
He then moved on to becoming a record company type guy.
He wanted to reissue these in-demand records.
So he got in bed with Selectadisc, who were definitely the biggest retailer of northern soul in Britain.
One night they brought him to the Brit and he had a look in mgm casino in vegas box, probably laughed at some of the five pound sounds there.
But one thing he liked: he had a deep passion for British labels.
And he wanted all of them.
He showed me a box of absolutely top notch winners.
I was the first person ever.
We did a trade and I started to play them.
Really, my reputation grew over the course of four weeks, from August 1973 onwards.
That was it for me.
I was suddenly getting calls.
We went to the Mecca, I showed Ian Levine some records.
So of course I was a giant ego.
On the off chance?
I would never have taken my records to Blackpool Mecca because I would never have been worthy.
It was more for credibility.
In those days it was a macho thing.
Paid our money to get in.
There I was with my box.
We walked in and I distinctly remember it.
And secondly: the music was crap.
You could buy them from Selectadisc.
So my mates were really uptight about it.
One of them went up to the resident disc jockey Russ Winstanley.
Kev Roberts from Nottingham.
del pool hours sol casino and a guy called Ian Fishwick, just a local pop DJ from Wigan, had decided to play northern soul with nobody else on.
So I became the next man in line.
I played an hours worth of my top tunes and they went down a storm.
I was up there absolutely petrified.
It was a massive room.
Do you wanna work here every week?
Really from that moment on, northern soul tainted love wigan casino over.
I got bookings everywhere, the phone never stopped ringing.
Chris Burton in Stoke in particular had recognised that northern soul was very popular.
But it taught me a lot about being a DJ.
Pete really showed me the way later on in life, how to do it properly.
Could we talk tainted love wigan casino about the rivalries that developed between Wigan and Blackpool?
I think as Russ grew in stature with Wigan Casino, the Casino developed its own crowd.
Very different to the Mecca.
So Ian Levine was king of his castle and Russ Winstanley was king of his.
Ian Levine was playing his own sounds.
But neither was Russ Winstanley.
He might have thought he needed Ian at some stage, but he had a bigger venue.
By Christmas of 1973 — no disrespect to Blackpool Mecca — but they were running second.
There were 2,000 people at Wigan.
Why would Russ even have to listen to what Ian had to say?
Was Russ more of a crowd-pleaser than Ian?
Well, Russ was nowhere near as intelligent or innovative as Ian Levine.
I think Russ would be the first to agree with that.
I had the first copy in the country.
When I first got it I thought this is going to be a monster and I played it about six time over three weeks, but it was a disaster.
It cleared the floor.
That was the difference between Wigan Casino and the Mecca.
The tempo was absolutely critical because of the size of the venue.
Was there a difference in the drug consumption of Wigan and Blackpool?
Wigan was 95% drugs.
Blackpool was more like 30%.
Wigan Casino had the fastest tempo of any all-nighter.
Your love of northern soul eventually took you to the States.
How did that happen?
I first went to New York in 1975.
I was oblivious to bad areas.
All I knew was that shop on 122nd Street and 8th Avenue had got soul and I was going.
This opened my eyes to a different sound, because the Mecca was now playing what I call modern soul.
I always remember going to a store called Downstairs Records in New York.
So they opened a shop selling oldies and new stuff.
Stuff on Scepter, Roulette and Wand.
They were piling 12-inch singles up and walking out with them.
So I started to take a few back.
A month later it started to get to him.
I think the Ritz all-dayers had just started in Manchester, so a slightly see more crowd was developing.
It made dance records acceptable to the northern crowd.
Some records escalated the split.
A record hated by the hardcore.
But a monster to everybody else.
Who started playing it?
And he went completely into the disco thing.
In some quarters it worked a treat, and he captured a different audience.
But some of the hustle-type records he was playing were not well received in northern soul terms.
Did he alienate his traditional crowd?
Did he attract a new crowd?
The alienated went down to Wigan and stayed there.
He brought a new crowd in.
What was the difference in crowd composition?
It was a slicker, more smartly dressed, trendier crowd.
Undoubtedly the group that broke the mould for the Mecca was Brass Construction.
Maybe it was a natural progression.
But it was a funkier groove.
It was a new tempo for people north of Watford to get into.
It was the time when the Chris Hill, Robbie Vincent visit web page moved up north.
Around 1979 was when the north and south were coming together for the first time.
That was the progressive movement of Blackpool Mecca, Levine and Curtis.
More so, Colin Curtis for the funkier kind of groove.
Yeah, I see Levine being more of a guy.
Colin liked the look of the James Brown thing and got into that.
Why do you think the scene died?
I know Wigan lost its license, but was it on its way tainted love wigan casino anyway?
No doubt about it.
People were growing up, getting married.
End of an era.
How long did you continue to go to New York?
I lived there in 1978.
A lot of these DJs were turning me on to record stores and knew I was into an older sound.
When I think back to the characters I met.
I used to supply a store with the great name of Disco Disc in Forest Hills.
There was a guy named Bob Miller.
He used to casino new downs years eve tioga all the Click here who worked in the Queens area.
After that, I wished I kept in touch with him!
I remember the Paradise Garage.
He used to play a lot of soulful stuff.
That was the record at the Garage.
I saw Larry Levan at a KISS-FM launch party in 1980 when that brand was launched.
There was playing black music.
KISS came on and they were very hot at taking records and breaking them well up front.
I was a radio anorak.
And they came like a breath of fresh air.
They won a new audience by being young and happening.
Then WKTU came and gave KISS a run for their money.
KTU had a totally different style: DJs with no personality.
And it was a winner.
They used to say so little.
They never said anything.
I could see what they were doing.
Get to Philadelphia and ask about people like Gerry Blavert, playing brilliant records.
I used to go down to Philadelphia a lot.
And the beach music scene down in North Carolina.
Tell me about the beach music scene.
So that became the basis of the beach music scene.
Not only do they call it beach music, but the style of dancing is called shagging.
This is where the Tams came from then.
I first cottoned on to this when I became friendly with a very influential DJ down there called John Hook.
You know what their big anthem is?
Again, anoraking on the radio, I got just past the Delaware Bridge and on AM radio on WBT 1110 I picked up this beach music stuff.
I stopped and phoned the DJ and explained to him what northern soul was.
He was shocked that I was looking for these northern obscurities on small Detroit labels.
Does this beach scene still exist?
A few beers and a bop with a little cool element because the records were not always hits.
Northern soul was like that.
Two guys working in a factory.
It was an interesting, quirky thing started by Ian Levine, I think.
It turned out to be by the Coasters on Atco.
Do you think people did take it seriously?
But that was at the tail-end of the Wigan Casino when I think northern soul was going crazy.
Credibility-wise, northern soul had two big disasters.
Disaster one: In late 1974 the record companies clocked on to what was happening and started infiltrating northern sounds and won over Russ Winstanley and persuaded him that this is where it was at.
Richard had become the new Ian Levine, and Russ totally went against that and created his own dancefloor.
Russ played it and it was massive.
That very much swayed me against Wigan.
The next big mistake was 1978.
For some unknown reason, there was an abundance of good northern soul records being played by Richard Searling, but I think the problem was Richard had become the new Ian Levine.
Russ totally went against that and created his own dancefloor.
But Russ suddenly went a million miles down the road and started to find pop stompers that were worse than the first lot.
American obscurities with almost Dolly Parton-type vocals.
That was the kiss of death.
The real soul fans were getting off on what Richard was trying to do — find good American soul records, but I think he was on his own.
The northern scene was shrinking.
Casino Classics came from Spark and Barry Kingston.
Tom was an archivist who was employed by Motown to reactivate the Motown Yesteryear series.
On a chance meeting with Simon Soussan, Tom loaned Simon some records and in there was the Frank Wilson disc.
Simon heard it and did some research surrounding it and it turns out that nobody had ever seen or heard it.
The record was instantly massive.
Simon Soussan quickly pressed up copies, which sold like wildfire.
I bought the record from Jonathan for a load of albums and 12-inches worth £350, an unearthly sum.
Do wanna sell it?
The upshot of it was I kept it till 1991 and Tim Brown offered me £5,000 for it.
So I sold it.
And that copy has just been sold to a collector in Scotland for £15,000!
The first ever copy is with Tim Brown and the second copy, which is in better condition, is with this guy in Scotland.
There have been a bunch of revivals over the years.
How do you feel about it all now?
Well, there was only one golden era of northern soul.
There was only one definitive playlist.
This interview was conducted in September 1998 in London.
© To hear the sounds of Wigan Casino, check out the playlist below, exclusively compiled by Kev Roberts for DJ History.


Mix - Wigan Casino Live 1974 - Gloria Jones - Tainted Love.mp4


172 173 174 175 176

The legendary Wigan Casino was one of the defining nightclubs of the 1970s. A decade or so later Soft Cell's version of Tainted Love was a ...


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